Mini CooperNon-Porsche Inventory

2009 Mini Cooper crème base 69k

By March 30, 2022April 1st, 2022No Comments

2009 Mini Cooper crème base 69k
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BMW introduced an all-new, second generation of the Hardtop/Hatch Mini model in November 2006, on a re-engineered platformincorporating many stylistic and engineering changes. It uses the Prince engine, the architecture of which is shared with PSA Peugeot Citroën and is designed to be more cost-effective and fuel-efficient, and is manufactured at the BMW Hams Hall engine plant in Warwickshire, Great Britain.[22] The engineering was done in the United Kingdom by BMW Group UK Engineering, in Munich, Germany at BMW Group headquarters, and by other third parties, BMW Group hired Italdesign Giugiaro (IDG) in Turin, to coordinate the engineering, including the development and validation of the body, structure and chassis of the new Mini. Key Production Associates from affected areas in the assembly process at Plant Oxford were seconded to IDG for the duration of the build to ensure a smooth integration of the new model back in Oxford.

Initially launched in the Cooper and Cooper S trim levels; the range was completed in 2007 with the Mk II Mini One. An economical version called the First was added in 2009.[23] From April 2007 a diesel was available badged as the Cooper D, which was supplemented in 2010 by the lower powered One D[24]and in January 2011 with a new 2.0 L diesel badged as the Cooper SD.

The second generation was again offered in Japan at Japanese BMW locations 24 February 2007, and it continued to be in compliance with Japanese Government dimension regulations which supported sales of both the hatchback and the convertible.

Though the Mk II has a familiar look, every panel on the new car was changed from the previous model. New safety requirements resulted in the overall length increasing by 60 millimetres (2.4 in), the front end raised and the indicators being repositioned inside the headlight housings. The headlights themselves are now fixed to the front quarter panels rather than being integrated with the bonnet, so that they are not raised up with it when the bonnet opens. The car has a restyled grille and larger rear light clusters. The Cooper S retains the bonnet scoop in order to keep an association with the outgoing model – although the relocation of the intercooler to the front of the engine means that the scoop is now purely decorative. In addition, the Cooper S no longer has the battery located under the boot floor, instead being found in the more conventional location under the bonnet. The C-pillars are no longer encased in glass and have been shaped to improve aerodynamics and to reduce the tendency for dirt to accumulate on the back of the car. Much criticised for the lack of rear legroom, Mini added more space for rear passengers by creating sculpted cut-outs in the rear of the front seats. An engine start button replaces the conventional ignition key and, with the optional ‘Comfort Access’, the car may be unlocked with a button on the door handle when the key is brought close to the car.

Technical specificationsEdit

The Cooper and Cooper S models offer a new rear axle and aluminium components to reduce the car’s weight; and a Sports kit option comprising harder springs, damper and anti-roll bars is offered with both variants. Another key difference is the introduction of an upgraded electric power steeringsystem, the sharpness of which can be increased by pressing a “Sport” button in front of the gear lever (both auto and manual); additionally, the “Sport” button adjusts the response of the accelerator, and in conjunction with automatic transmission, also allows the engine to rev almost to the redline before changing gear.

In the Cooper model, the W11 Tritec four-cylinder engine was replaced with a 120 PS (88 kW) 1.6-litre Prince engine incorporating BMW’s Valvetronic infinitely variable valve lift, developed on and with Peugeot‘s core engine. It has been reported in road tests that this takes the car from 0–100 km/h in a claimed 9.1 seconds (0–60 mph: 8.5 seconds)[28]and has a top speed of 201 km/h (125 mph). Fuel economy of 48.7 miles per imperial gallon (5.80 L/100 km; 40.6 mpg‑US) on the combined cycle is nearly 8 miles per imperial gallon (6.7 mpg‑US) better. The more powerful 175 PS (129 kW) Cooper S replaces the supercharger with a new twin scroll turbocharger N14 DOHC motor in the interests of efficiency, and has gasoline direct injection; consequently, this engine version does not have Valvetronic. This engine also has an “overboost” function which temporarily raises the torque by 20 N⋅m (15 lbf⋅ft) under hard acceleration. As a result, 0–100 km/h is covered in a claimed 7.1 seconds (0–60 mph: 6.7 seconds),[28]and top speed is 230 km/h (140 mph). It achieves similar improvements in fuel economy to the Cooper, returning 40.9 mpg‑imp(6.91 L/100 km; 34.1 mpg‑US) combined. Both engines may be mated to either a 6-speed manualor automatic gearbox. The turbocharged engine is the same (although with some French engineering modifications) as the one in the Peugeot 207 GTi/RC.

In 2011 the Peugeot DV6 (Ford DLD-416) engine was replaced with the 1.6 and 2.0 BMW N47 Diesels.

All models of the Mk II with optional dynamic stability control (DSC) also include “Hill Assist”, which prevents the car from rolling backwards on an incline by holding the brakes for 2 seconds after the driver releases the brake pedal, allowing the driver time to engage the accelerator pedal without the vehicle drifting. Also included with DSC is hydraulic EBA (Emergency Brake Assist) as opposed to the mechanical system on Minis without DSC. DSC is standard on all Minis since September 2008.

The interior of the Mk II echoes the style of the earlier model, but is in fact a complete redesign. The boot of the new car has an additional 10 litres (2.2 imp gal; 2.6 US gal) of load space. Other changes in design – both visible and otherwise – have contributed to the Mini’s recently awarded five stars in the Euro NCAP tests. One example is the higher front bonnet, which now complies with the European pedestrian collision regulations.

Breakdown statistics reported by the German Automobile Club (ADAC) in May 2010 placed the Mini at the top of the small car class in respect of the low break-down rates achieved for cars aged between 0 and 4 years,

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